Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms An Analysis of Fire and Ice Symbolism in Jane Eyre

You are searching about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms, today we will share with you article about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms was compiled and edited by our team from many sources on the internet. Hope this article on the topic Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms is useful to you.

An Analysis of Fire and Ice Symbolism in Jane Eyre

Charlotte Brontë often uses symbolism in Jane Eyre. A number of repetitive images are used, partly as a means of unifying the vast overall variety of the narrative. The following analysis focuses on Brontë’s use of the imagery of fire and ice, examining the symbolic attributes of these images and how they are used in several scenes throughout the text. Excerpts from the 2000 Oxford World’s Classics novel.

In the story, there is a dichotomy between the ideas of fire and ice. Fire is often associated with passion and rebellion, as is evident in the following passage, where the young protagonist reflects on the state of her mind after she barks at her aunt’s abuse: “A ridge of lighted heather, alive, staring, devouring, might have was the emblem of my mind when I accused and threatened Mrs. Reid” (1, 4, p.37). However, when the fire died down, the same ridge is described as “black and exploded after the flames died down” (1, 4, p.37-8). Coldness is often associated in the text with isolation and desolation.

Jane is angry with her aunt because of the woman’s unfair treatment of her. From the first chapter, she is shown isolated from the Reed family. Images of fire and ice are evoked in this scene where the main character sits alone at her window. She is shut out from the rest of her adopted family and the warmth of the fireplace. Brontë describes only the panes that “protect but do not separate” (1.1, p.8) her heroine from the cold and windy November south.

The “Deadly White Realms” depicted in Bewick’s illustrations A History of British Birds, from which Jane reads, further exemplify icy imagery and elaborate on the theme of cold. These shots are also important in that they foreshadow some events much later in the story, including Jane’s lonely wanderings on the Yorkshire moors after her escape from Thornfield. “Abandoned expanses of gloomy space” (1, 1, p. 8) intensify the feeling of the main character’s own desolation and her desire for a home that accepts her.

While the imagery of ice is used to symbolize Jane’s own inner sense of loneliness and desolation, fire is figuratively used to illustrate the heroine’s anger at her mistreatment. When she is locked in the red room, Jane observes how cold the room is due to the fact that the fireplace is rarely used. She describes herself as “gradually cooling like a stone” (1, 2, p. 16). When she wakes up in the children’s room at the beginning of the next chapter, she tells the reader of “a horrible red reflection, crossed by thick black streaks” (1, 3, p.18). Although it turns out to be just a child’s fire, when this section is considered together with the previous scene where the main character reflects on her situation with the Reed family, it becomes clear that this is the first example of Brontë using the imagery of fire to depict anger. her heroine.

At Gateshead, Jane’s anger culminates in her outburst against Mrs. Reid before she is sent to Lowood School, and although she subsequently learns to control her fiery temper, the theme of anger against injustice and its expression through fire continues throughout the story, albeit at a more low level. When Jane works as a governess, an important chapter tells of her pacing up and down the third floor of Thornfield, reflecting her restless nature. In this scene, fiery imagery is associated with ambition, as Jane feels limited by her current calling.

The nature of Brontë’s descriptions of her heroine’s environment is often determined by Jane’s emotional state. A scene that aptly illustrates this quality occurs after Jane learns that Rochester is already married. Reflecting on the midsummer vista from her bedroom window at Thornfield, she recounts how “the ice covered the ripe apples, the drifts pressed down the luxuriant roses; a frozen shroud lay on the hayfield and cornfield” (2, 11, p. 295). The depressed state of the heroine is outwardly reflected through Brontë’s winter symbolism. Her descriptions are reminiscent of the snowy deserts of the Arctic from the book Bewick.

Several readings of Brontë’s novel, particularly those that have adopted a feminist stance, have identified a thematic connection between the heroine and Rochester’s mad wife. They see Bertha as the physical manifestation of Jane’s psychological anger. Bertha’s insane violence is literally expressed by fire, both when she tries to set fire to Rochester’s bed and when she burns Thornfield. This is in stark contrast to Jane, whose anger is expressed through figurative images of fire.

As the story unfolds, it becomes apparent that there is a juxtaposition between passion and reason. The images of fire and ice play a symbolic role in the representation of these qualities. Jane’s two potential suitors, Rochester and St. John, are matched in the qualities they embody. Rochester is closely associated with fire, with his hot and reckless nature, while St. John is compared to ice, with his disposition of cool reasoning and emotional detachment.

After she discovers that he is already married, Jane experiences an intense emotional upheaval about her feelings for Rochester. As she agonizes over whether to accept his offer to be his mistress or leave Thornfield, she describes feeling like “a hand of fiery iron grasped my vitals. A terrible moment: full of struggle, blackness, burning!’ (3, 1, p. 315). At this point in the story, Brontë implies that it would be inappropriate for Jane to accept Rochester’s current offer. The story suggests that Rochester must redeem his licentious position if he and Jane are to marry. The physical damage he suffers as a result of trying to save Bertha can be seen as his baptism of fire. Thus, Jane and Rochester’s eventual union can be seen as a denouement of passion and reason.

Video about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms

You can see more content about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms on our youtube channel: Click Here

Question about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms

If you have any questions about Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms, please let us know, all your questions or suggestions will help us improve in the following articles!

The article Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms was compiled by me and my team from many sources. If you find the article Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms helpful to you, please support the team Like or Share!

Rate Articles Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms

Rate: 4-5 stars
Ratings: 5855
Views: 27115336

Search keywords Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms

Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms
way Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms
tutorial Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms
Representations Of The Dead In The Old And New Kingdoms free
#Analysis #Fire #Ice #Symbolism #Jane #Eyre

Source: https://ezinearticles.com/?An-Analysis-of-Fire-and-Ice-Symbolism-in-Jane-Eyre&id=6404293

Related Posts

default-image-feature

How Do You Put Your 3 Year Old To Sleep Parenting Middle School Children: 3 Little Known Reasons Why Your Child Misbehaves

You are searching about How Do You Put Your 3 Year Old To Sleep, today we will share with you article about How Do You Put Your…

default-image-feature

How To Tell If 3 Year Old Has A Uti Cure a UTI – 7 Alternative Treatments That Work

You are searching about How To Tell If 3 Year Old Has A Uti, today we will share with you article about How To Tell If 3…

default-image-feature

Replacing Old Wood Burning Fireplace Insert Insert With New Fireplace Electric Fireplaces Are Functional And Decorative

You are searching about Replacing Old Wood Burning Fireplace Insert Insert With New Fireplace, today we will share with you article about Replacing Old Wood Burning Fireplace…

default-image-feature

How Do You Put A 3 Month Old To Sleep Cool Tips Before Getting Home With the Newborn

You are searching about How Do You Put A 3 Month Old To Sleep, today we will share with you article about How Do You Put A…

default-image-feature

How To Tell How Old 3 Feet A Rattlesnake Is A Walk in the Woods – Exploring Stone Cairns and Stone Piles

You are searching about How To Tell How Old 3 Feet A Rattlesnake Is, today we will share with you article about How To Tell How Old…

default-image-feature

How Do You Potty Train A 3 Year Old Girl Toilet Training Tips for Girls – Teaching Them the Right Way

You are searching about How Do You Potty Train A 3 Year Old Girl, today we will share with you article about How Do You Potty Train…